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A very short guide to using white & black watercolour paints

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

White The technique used to acheive white in your watercolour painting is meant to be acheived by the lack of colour, instead using the paper to provide white to create highlights in a painting (commonly using making fluid or wax resist techniques), if that's the case why do manufacturers produce two whites in their ranges? Most typically Chinese and Titanium White. Chinese White is the traditional option, originally introduced by Winsor & Newton in 1834, it is semi-opaque and has a blue undertone, many artists using it at the end of their painting for highlights or to dull some colour mixtures during painting or mix...

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Stretching watercolour paper and common terms

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

When using a lot of water with thinner watercolour papers (less than 260 lb/ 356gsm in weight), it may cause the paper to cockle, warp or buckle as it dries. This happens because the application of liquid to one side of the sheet causes it to expand slightly more than the other dry side. As this is undesirable the common practice to stop this from happening is to stretch the paper before use. Soaking and stretching watercolour paper Using running water from a tap (another option is to use a container of water to evenly soak the paper), immerse the sheet of...

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Michael Harding Hand Made Oil Paints, explanation of Colour descriptions

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

In this article we explain the different headings in the below list of paint colours as taken from the PDF Product Guide and Colour Chart produced by top quality handmade oil paint manufacturer Michael Harding.  Series Number Michael Harding paints are put into price series, the more expensive the ingredients (typically pigments) used then the higher the price and because the paints use very little fillers but instead mostly pure pigment then the quality is reflected in the price. The Colour Index Number: The Colour Index™ is a standardised system for recording the chemical composition of a dye or pigment . This external...

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Guide to removing dents and re-tensioning stretched canvases by Loxley

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

Removing small dents in stretched canvas:Occasionally canvases will get small dents where something has lent against the surface, to remove them, simply spray a little clean water onto the rear of the dented part of the canvas and allow to air dry, the stretched fibres will then re-tighten and return them to a good condition.   Why are additional wedges sometimes supplied and why are they used? When supplied, Loxley canvases have been carefully stretched by hand, to create tension that is sufficient to hold the surface flat without any sagging. Sometimes however, after a period of time the canvas may need re-tensioning to get...

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Expert Guide to Derwent Inktense

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

Derwent have produced this excellent PDF Expert Guide to their Inktense range of Pencils, Blocks and new Pans that come in a handy travel box. Inktense pencils and blocks can be used on their own like traditional colouring pencils or pastels offering a range of vibrant colours, but once water is added the colours turn into permanent ink-like colours that can be used on a wide range of substrates including fabric. This useful and inspiring guide has lots of photos and illustrations and includes: Getting Started  Preparing your Palette: Inktense Block Washes Techniques: Using Inktense Pencils & Blocks  Hand Lettering: With...

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