Advice

Black! Black!- A short guide to some of the blacks and their uses

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

A short guide to some of the blacks available in Oil, Acrylics & Water colours. IVORY BLACK (AKA Bone Black)  A general purpose, most commonly used, stable black with brown undertones and excellent tinting powers.The name derives from traditional method for obtaining it: by roasting elephant tusks, which obviously isn’t the case anymore.LAMP BLACK (AKA Carbon Black)  Opaque, permanent & light-fast it has a bluish tint, ideal for producing a variety of cool blue greys.One of the oldest pigments, made of pure carbon originally from the residual soot of burnt oil lamps. MARS BLACK A denser, more neutral black with...

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About Winsor & Newton new CADMIUM FREE Watercolours

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

This article has been taken in its entirety from Winsor & Newton's website, the link to the original article can be found here. 2019 sees another Winsor & Newton world first, with the introduction of a new innovation in water colour: the world’s first Cadmium-Free formulas that provide true parity in colour and performance to genuine Cadmium paints. Cadmium pigments are much loved by artists due to their ability to deliver intensely bright, lightfast results. However, Cadmium is a heavy metal and - although there is no globally harmonised view - there are some concerns about its safety. Areas such as...

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A Brief Guide to watercolour materials

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

Watercolour paints Are a translucent medium that consist mainly of pure natural or synthetic colour pigment mixed with Gum Arabic. It is supplied in either tubes or pans (solid blocks of colour), when mixed with water the colour spreads easily onto paper.Watercolour painting can be a relatively inexpensive way of starting to paint with lots of resources, in the forms of books, courses, videos and on-line content available to help those starting out. It is also highly portable if desired, lending itself to working outside or producing sketches.There isn’t really any other medium that matches the delicate luminosity of transparent...

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A brief Guide to Oil Paints and accessories

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

Traditional Oil Paint is a variety of a slow-drying paint made up of particles of pigment suspended in a drying oil that on exposure to air forms a tough, bright, rich coloured film. The advantage of the slow-drying quality of oil paint is that an artist can develop a painting gradually, making changes or corrections if necessary. Oil paint is popular a popular choice as its translucence, sheen, drying time and thickness can all be adjusted with the use of mediums, waxes, resins, and varnishes. Typically the drying oil used in paint manufacture is a vegetable oil, with linseed oil...

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A very short guide to using white & black watercolour paints

Posted by Jeff Rowley on

White The technique used to acheive white in your watercolour painting is meant to be acheived by the lack of colour, instead using the paper to provide white to create highlights in a painting (commonly using making fluid or wax resist techniques), if that's the case why do manufacturers produce two whites in their ranges? Most typically Chinese and Titanium White. Chinese White is the traditional option, originally introduced by Winsor & Newton in 1834, it is semi-opaque and has a blue undertone, many artists using it at the end of their painting for highlights or to dull some colour mixtures during painting or mix...

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